What’s the story with Montessori?

Mother-of-two shares her experience raising her children using the practical learning approach…and how you can do the same

Montessori is an educational approach, I also think it’s a parenting philosophy, that follows the children’s developmental needs,’ she said.

‘It’s important for their own confidence, they learn what they can and can’t do.

‘It’s easier as a parent as your child is able to help themselves around the home … and it makes them feel empowered.’

Ms D’Alton, who lives in Brisbane, Australia, incorporates a Montessori philosophy at home with her two sons: Caspar, eight, and Otis, five.

At home the boys are given the tools to become more self-sufficient by placing things like their wardrobe, access to drinking water and brooms at a height they can reach.

This means from a younger age they are able to get their own glass of water instead of asking, they can dress themselves and even clean up if they spill something.

The practical life skills encompass all aspects of the home, including the kitchen.